LEARN SLIDE GUITAR
FEATURED ARTIST
Roy Rogers
"Six notes can be tonal overkill. Most of the classic blues guys played the bass note, often with the thumb, as a pivot note."

Hound Dog Taylor


Roy Rogers
Roy Rogers
Roy Rogers (born July 28, 1950, Redding, California) is an American slide guitarist and record producer. He was named after the singing cowboy, Roy Rogers. Rogers plays a variety of guitar styles related to the Delta blues, but is most often recognized for his slide work.
In the 1980s Rogers was a member of John Lee Hooker's Coast to Coast Band. Rogers produced and/or played on several of Hooker's best-known albums, including Boom Boom, Mr. Lucky, and the Grammy winning effort, The Healer.
LEARN SLIDE GUITAR
ROY ROGERS _ SLIDE GUITAR TIPS

* Know the Angles:
"Your slide should be held at a right angle to the neck, perpendicular, because that will help you play in tune over the frets. So don't hold your slide hand at other than a right angle. And you don't have to push down hard on the strings. You don't want the string to hit the fret. You should take the action up a little bit at the bridge, too."

* Vary Your Approach: "You want to practice approaching the slide in a number of different ways. You want to slide down and up to notes, and you want to hammer on the notes. And when you slide up or down to the note, make sure you end up right over the note. And when you wanna hammer on the note, like the eighth or tenth fret, just place the slide right over the fret and start. That's all good practice for pitch. It's all about pitch, really. You can get all the in-between tones, and you can get away with playing a little flat sometimes, but never sharp."

* Start Simple: "Using open E tuning [E-B-E-G#-B-D], where you have the root on the sixth string, start real slow and try to add improvised slide notes. Keep it very simple, adding slide notes during the course of a 12-bar blues, and then speed it up as you become more proficient. Go chord by chord and it's real simple. This helps you build feel. Its great to be able to play fast licks, but it's meaningless unless you know where to put them. And always start slow enough to play in time. If you can't make a change or lose the beat, you've gotta go back and start slower."

* Think Chordally. "Try the Elmore James chordal approach — 12th fret, then the fifth fret for the four, and the seventh fret for the five. There's no need to include the fifth and sixth strings to make the chord. Play those changes and get used to the way the basic chords sound using just those four notes on the high strings. Generally you don't need all six strings because you're pedaling the bass or hitting it in another manner. Six notes can be tonal overkill. Most of the classic blues guys played the bass note, often with the thumb, as a pivot note. They weren't using the low strings for the chords. And remember to keep your slide right over the fret, even though in normal guitar playing your finger falls behind the fret."

* Play Something Sweet. "Try a simple tune. ‘Walkin Blues' is simple enough. It's a riff that incorporates slide and non-slide playing. It's in open E. Playing off the third fret of the fifth string, which is the flat seven, you state the signature riff and add a slide in the riff. It's not all slide. Combining slide and rhythm playing is what it's about. And it's always good to be able to play a tune you know."

* A Bonus Tip: "The most important thing to remember is to always have fun. Don't let it become laborious."

With thanks to Gibson Guitars


Below are some of the best teach yourself Slide DVDs available
DVD-Slide Guitar For Rock & Blues - ROY ROGERS
From Homespun - List Price: $29.95
OUR PRICE: $26.99
THIS IS A GREAT DVD ! - recommended by SlideGuitarist.com
Learn to play the blistering guitar solos, churning rhythms and wiling slide sounds that have impressed Roy Rogers’ fans worldwide.
Roy has been called "a force to be reckoned with" (Guitar Player) and "an exceptionally articulate slide guitarist" (Rolling Stone). Now he teaches his award-winning style along with dynamic arrangements to several blues favorites.
Roy covers all the essentials—how to get into open tunings, hold the slide, play with vibrato and proper intonation, and develop a powerful picking style using plectrum and fingers. You’ll progress to advanced slide techniques including licks and their variations, improvisations, harmonics, how to play rhythm along with lead riffs, classic endings and turnarounds, use of dynamics, hammers and pulls, and much more. Roy and his band perform all the tunes taught on this DVD. Before long, you’ll be playing Look Over Yonders Wall
.
See Roy play 'Walkin' Blues' from this DVD >
Customer Reviews
Learn from the best
Awesome DVD

See all our Slide Lesson DVDs >



Warren Haynes DVD - Electric Blues & Slide Guitar
Directed by Arlen Roth
- List Price: $24.95
Our Price: $19.49
Recommended by SlideGuitarist.com
Warren Haynes, of the Allman Brothers Band, has also enjoyed an outstanding solo career as a bluesman. On this great DVD he covers a wide range of blues and slide skills and techniques, including phrasing, vibrato, string bending, and soloing as well as mixing major and minor scales, using space, and looking for blue notes within intervals. An intense and rewarding blues lesson guaranteed to improve your playing! Includes a new introduction by Jeff Golub. Jeff began his career as guitarist for rocker Billy Squier. He has recorded numerous solo CDs and is a highly valued session player and sideman, having worked with such artists as Peter Wolf, John Waite, Tina Turner, Vanessa Williams, and Rod Stewart. You'll never miss a note! You see the music and the tablature on screen as it's being played! All right- and left-hand techniques are shown in close up and with helpful split-screen effects to make learning easy. Also includes: Artist biography, selected discography, suggested listening, booklet with music examples, and more. 1 hour, 28 minutes. Languages: English,
See Warren play Slide in Standard Tuning from this DVD >
Customer Reviews
One of the best Hot Licks videos
Great Blues teaching and technique

It Might Get Loud - Jack White, The Edge, Jimmy Page. DVD
Directed by Davis Guggenheim - Our Price: $10.49
Three generations of rock guitarists come together for It Might Get Loud, a 2009 documentary directed by Davis Guggenheim (An Inconvenient Truth). These are not just your garden-variety guitar gods: Jimmy Page, in his mid-'60s at the time of the film, founded Led Zeppelin, who dominated the 1970s following the breakup of the Beatles. As a member of U2, 48-year-old David Evans, better known as the Edge, created one of the most distinctive and influential sounds of the past quarter century. And 34-year-old Jack White (of the White Stripes, the Raconteurs, and the Dead Weather) was described by one music publication as "the most significant rock 'n' roll figure of the past ten years." Guggenheim, who followed the three around for the better part of a year, takes us into their individual lives, past and present. The three also converge on a Hollywood sound stage, where they chat and a do a little jamming on Zep's "In My Time of Dying" (with all three playing slide guitar) and the Band's "The Weight." It's hard to say if the film's appeal will extend beyond guitar freaks, but at the very least, It Might Get Loud offers some interesting insight into the soul and inspiration behind some of pop's best and most popular music.
See Jack White make a Diddley Bow, from the movie >
Customer Review
All I can say is wow....

> DVDs - Learn Slide Guitar


SLIDE GUITAR TUNINGS

Tuning
Low
6
5
4
3
2
1
High

Standard
E
A
D
G
B
E
Open E
E
B
E
G#
B
E
EM7
E
B
E
G#
B
D#
Open A
E
A
E
A
C#
E
Bm7
D
A
D
F#
B
D
Open D
D
A
D
F#
A
D
B Flat
D
Bb
D
F
Bb
D
D Minor
D
A
D
F
A
D
Open G
D
G
D
G
B
D
Open Db
Db
Ab
Db
F
Ab
Db
Open C
C
G
C
E
G
C
Open F
C
F
C
F
A
C


Slide players tend to use open tunings, though some guitarists like to play slide in standard tuning.
Elmore James played a lot in Open E, this is a great tuning to improvise in and play with others as 3rd fret is G and 5th fret is A etc.
Open E is great for an Electric Guitar as the neck can stand the strain of tuning up, not a good idea to do this with your precious vintage acoustic. Open D might be best for your Acoustic as you tune down and it takes the tension out of the strings, put a capo on the second fret and ...... bingo, you are in Open E tuning with the 14th fret inline with the body of the acoustic is your new octave E
Try them all out, find a tuning that lets you express yourself.

Cigar Box Guitar Tunings
3 String Cigar Box Guitars
are often Tuned to DAD.
The tune is played on the
melody string and the other
two strings act as drone
strings filling out the backing sound. More >
Also try -
DAD (Key of D)
DGD
(Key of
G)
EAA
(Key of
A)
DAA
(Key of
D)
DGA
(Key of
G)
DAC (Key of Dm)
CGG
(Key of
C)
CFC
(Key of
F)
EAG
(Key of
Am)
EAE
(Key of
A)



Chords for Open Tuned Guitar and Open Tuned Slide Guitar - Click Here >
When you have your guitar tuned to an open chord why not add a few chords to your slide playing. The wonderful Roy Rogers advocates the Delta Blues style where he plays chords and slide. See his excellent Tutorial DVD where he explains how to mix it up.


Steel Guitarist Shirt Design
Don't Fret - Get the shirt today >
Steel Guitarist T Shirt

> DVDs about Slide Guitar









copyright © SlideGuitarist.com - all rights reserved